Practice hard. Practice well

Practice hard. Practice well.

When I started writing this blog in 2003, I was not a strong writer. Sixteen years later, I am a better writer. Doing something every day is the best way to improve at something.

I think everyone can improve at things they are not good at and become competent, even excellent, at them. I am not going to win a Pulitzer Prize, but I can write well and have become a strong communicator by practicing it routinely. Practice really works.

It has been over 10 years of practice for my relationship. Pretty damn solid now. On to the next thing to practice.

Healthy solitude

Nicholas Bate, always a favourite

With healthy solitude comes profound insight. Seek more of the former and make life easier.

As work rushes on, and I overwork again. It’s the quiet and alone moments, when time is allocated to sit still and pat the needy cat, that some form of clarity awakens. Then I realise that the path is so clear.

As the meaningless options fade away.

What is complex becomes simple.

Is your business a junction or a destination

What is your business about?

Yahoo grew as a place to stay. They built one service after another, hoping for time on site.

Google, on the other hand, began as a place to visit when you wanted to go somewhere else. That’s their entire business model. Time on site wasn’t as important to them as the accuracy of their direction. Come to leave.

Facebook, on the other hand, is organized to be a one-way street, with people staying on the site as long as possible.

Of course, it’s not simply web sites that work this way. Either we organize for junctions and trajectory, or we build our place as a destination, physically or as metaphor.

Playing to your strengths as a leader doesn’t make you a good boss – in fact, it can make you a bad boss.

So, you have to ask yourself: Are your actions feeding your team, or your ego?

Focus on what you’re good at, and the team never becomes good at it themselves. Focus on what you’re good at, and you never see things for what they really are.

Resist viewing your strengths as the only way to make the team strong. Resist falling in love with the short-term results of doing what feels good to be doing.

Find someone who will tell you the truth. Your co-founder, your coworkers. Ask them if what you’re doing that you’re good at is really helping move the team forward.

Our strengths are our weakness, our weakness our strengths.

Also, the entire Know Your Team blog is amazing.